Domestic Terrorism

Terrorism vs. Domestic Terrorism, is There Really a Difference?

As the U.S. reels again from another mass killing on November 4th, 2017, this time in a church in Texas by one of our own, the issue of domestic terrorism is once again on everyone’s mind. So why are these individuals considered extremists and not terrorists in the eyes of the law? Terrorism is the act of intentional, indiscriminate violence carried out to create terror, or fear, to achieve a political, religious or ideological aim. In other words, terrorism requires an act to kill as many people as possible in the name of some belief. However, in the United States, if the individual(s) committing the act of terror is not linked to one of the sixty identified foreign terrorist groups specified by the State Department, the crime is not prosecuted as an act of terror. As a result, when people are mindlessly murdered on a massive scale, by such people as Timothy McVeigh (1999 Oklahoma City bombing, 168 killed) and James Holmes (2012 Aurora CO movie theater shooting, 12 killed), they are prosecuted for murder and not terrorism. Is there really a difference? It Isn’t a Federal Crime After the 9/11 attack, The Patriot Act was passed by Congress...

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